PROJECT INFORMATION

Project:
775 Pacific Highway, Gordon

Status:
Master Plan Concept Design Stage

Brief:
7 Buildings and Railway Concourse
112,000 m2 Residential
6,600 m2 Retail
Carparking for 1900

Site:
775 Pacific Highway,
Gordon, Sydney, NSW, 2072

CREDITS

Principal in Charge:
Richard Huxley

Design Principal:
Richard Huxley

Project Team Leader:
Richard Wilkinson

Project Team:
Richard Huxley
Richard Wilkinson
Siem Salem
Sheng Qiang
Kudzanayi Ganga

DESIGN STATEMENT

Located 15 km north of the Sydney CBD on a site that incorporates the Gordon Railway station, this master plan is placed in an important strategic location for the future planning of Greater Sydney. An opportunity is created to create a new residential and commercial hub of significant density on an important railway link.

The Master plan was approached with the intention to maximise density whilst also increasing public amenity, creating a central parkland, and minimising the impact of such a large development on the surrounding buildings. The solution to this challenge was found in an array of 7 individual buildings that contain 112,000 m2 of residential and 6,600 m2 of retail surrounded by 30,000m2 of parkland.

On the surface the 7 buildings are strategically arranged around a large public park, which creates a vibrant sense of place and high amenity for residents and surrounding community. The complexity of the scheme is revealed in section, where over 1900 carparks are cleverly reinterpreted as part of the landscape, without impacting on public amenity. The master plan aims to integrate and update the existing access to Gordon Railway station; Access to the railway is provided through sculptural architectural interventions that sit comfortably within the rolling landscape, allow clear points of entry to the station, and let light into the station below.

The 7 individual buildings break up the bulk of the development to allow light, and air into the parklands whilst framing the public space in a sophisticated and sleek manner. The curvature of the built form minimises the impact of the building footprint, and creates interesting visual avenues. Particular consideration was paid to the arrangement of the buildings to minimise overshadowing impact on the neighbouring sites.

For such a large development the end result is a place of significant character, vibrant, open and inviting, without compromising practicality and convenience. Pedestrians are given priority and 3ha of generous parklands to use while the density of the brief is achieved without intimidating the surrounding sites. The impact of the development is diminished, and is instead a comfortable intervention that adds interest and value to the community is created.